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Cullen College of Engineering
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Subsea Engineering Industry Day: June 28

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The UH Cullen College of Engineering and McDermott International Inc. invite members from Houston's petrochemical industry to Subsea Engineering Industry Day. The Cullen College of Engineering is looking for partners to provide ongoing industry feedback for the UH Subsea Engineering Program, the first program of its kind in the United States. The program is currently enrolling students for the fall 2011 certificate courses.

UH Cullen College of Engineering Dean Joseph Tedesco and Subsea Engineering Program Director Matthew Franchek will provide information about the development of the program along with specifics about course content and modules. Members from industry will also be in attendance to discuss their roles and benefits received in helping create the program and there will be a panel discussion about membership on the program's advisory board, using the course for employee training, and potential research and development needs from industry.

Subsea Engineering Industry Day
Tuesday, June 28, 2011
11:00 a.m.–1:30 p.m.

McDermott International
757 N. Eldridge Parkway, Houston, TX  77079
(Event will be held in the 14th Floor Auditorium)

Registration is required. (Lunch will be provided.)

RSVP by June 24 to arsmith [at] mcdermott [dot] com

For more information, contact mfranchek [at] uh [dot] edu (Matthew Franchek), Director of the UH Subsea Engineering Program.

Visit the Subsea Engineering Program page.

Faculty: 

Department: 

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